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what is supported

Posted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 3:51 am
by silver163
hello,

i know i have posted some time ago about my programmer's taking up a part of the project and developing the operating system. now i see a new version but i am not sure what is still supported an unsupported.

is serial, parrallel (LPT), usb supported now?
is SQL databases supported?
is 1Gbit/sec LAN NIC's supported?

Also I know that Microsoft's Windows XP was the last operating system based on the old kernel that they had and vista and future operating systems would be built on it. How will ReactOS adopt to this?

Re: what is supported

Posted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:21 am
by Lone_Rifle
To answer your questions:
No, try and see, try and see;

Official target compatibilities are Win2003 for the kernel and Win7 for the rest. Moving of targets are done by developer consensus.

Re: what is supported

Posted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 10:02 am
by vicmarcal
silver163 wrote:is serial, parrallel (LPT), usb supported now?
PS2 is supported since ages :)
USB is now present in trunk,it is in developing state,just for mouse and keyboard right now.Developing means not all of them works.
silver163 wrote:is SQL databases supported?
You have to try it,we didnt.If it works please tell us.
silver163 wrote:is 1Gbit/sec LAN NIC's supported?
Our compatibility with Nics have been improved a lot,you will see it in 0.3.10.
Current Nics supported : http://www.reactos.org/wiki/index.php/S ... work_cards
They are working in the actual Revisions,not in 0.3.9.

Windows Native Mode support?

Posted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 12:30 am
by shjacks45
I was trying to find what kind of support was in ReactOS for Windows Native mode, as most windows drivers load at that level (as do the user subsystems like Win32).

As for Network cards, there was a product called I believe "ANT" that was not freeware but which set up an "NDIS wrapper" that allowed wireless cards to work with windows drivers.

"USB" is a bus/communication interface not a device. Most USB devices use windows software to "create" the hardware device they emulate. Good information on microsoft.com/whdc web page. USB Standard lists standard devices and the plug and play ID passed to the system also has a fallback and theoretically can upload a driver, but that is asecurity risc and unimplemented. However the on sale USB External Hard Drive I just purchased doesn't emulate USB Mass Storage per Standard so I need to install a driver in windows.

Re: Windows Native Mode support?

Posted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 3:59 pm
by andrewweb
shjacks45 wrote:I was trying to find what kind of support was in ReactOS for Windows Native mode, as most windows drivers load at that level (as do the user subsystems like Win32).

As for Network cards, there was a product called I believe "ANT" that was not freeware but which set up an "NDIS wrapper" that allowed wireless cards to work with windows drivers.

"USB" is a bus/communication interface not a device. Most USB devices use windows software to "create" the hardware device they emulate. Good information on microsoft.com/whdc web page. USB Standard lists standard devices and the plug and play ID passed to the system also has a fallback and theoretically can upload a driver, but that is asecurity risc and unimplemented. However the on sale USB External Hard Drive I just purchased doesn't emulate USB Mass Storage per Standard so I need to install a driver in windows.
Um, ndiswrapper is a free and open source project, for LINUX...... not REACTOS. REACTOS is NOT linux!

what could be supported

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 5:48 am
by shjacks45
No, Linuxant driverloader is a different product which I don't think is GPL'd. If ReactOS is having trouble emulating Windows native mode support to use exisiting vendor Windows 5+ drivers then using a widget to adapt those drivers gives us so much more hardware usability.

It is a sad but most affordable consumer hardware is actually a bare hardware interface, with the perceived hardware emulated in software. An example is a $4 802.11g USB stick I opened up to find a radio and a usb interface. The driver disk included stubs for win98se thru vista, but the same win32 user mode software providing the hardware network processor functionality. WinModems, WinNICs, WinPrinters, (and WinScanners and WinVideo): software enhanced hardware is here to stay. Linuxant driverloader has helped me use WinModem and WinNIC (wireless) hardware in Linux, and a similar interim solution may be desirable until *vendors* start writing drivers for ReactOS.

>>>>>>> "Microsoft does not write hardware drivers for Windows."

Re: what is supported

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 5:50 am
by Z98
There is no reason for vendors to write drivers targeting ROS. We aim for NT compatibility and forcing vendors to do so means we failed in our objective.

Re: what is supported

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 1:06 pm
by Haos
Not to mention that it wont happen. See how much trouble has Linux with its manufacturer driver support...

Re: what is supported

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 4:35 pm
by Z98
With Linux it's just that certain kernel developers are so anal about the notion of closed source drivers and the fact that they don't bother maintaining a stable ABI. Why would hardware developers bother going through that much trouble for such a small market share?

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 5:59 pm
by hto
The market share is small, but linux people are vocal. So it still can be good to be a friend of linux. :)