The React OS core/ compatability ques

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To-mos
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The React OS core/ compatability ques

Post by To-mos » Mon May 14, 2007 5:56 pm

Is the React OS run on it's own core or is it taken/inspired from linux.
Also i see that the games/programs with it are all open source so i take it that win32 apps wont work on React OS. Will it get fragged thus needing a defragger, and will it work on a 64 bit system? Let me reword that will there be a 64bit edition compadible with the asus a8v series?
Last edited by To-mos on Mon May 14, 2007 7:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

GreatLord
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Post by GreatLord » Mon May 14, 2007 6:51 pm

ReactOS is complete own core. writen from scrach

ReactOS run only windows apps and games
the question is more like does my program or game work

here is some games I playing in reactos UT, winquake
they are my test games for regress they all are close source ;)

EmuandCo
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Post by EmuandCo » Mon May 14, 2007 6:57 pm

"Is the React OS run on it's own core or is it taken/inspired from linux."

ReactOS uses its own Kernel which is based on the NT Architecture like Windows NT/200/XP/Vista. The Kernel was written from scratch and it aims to be fully compatible to Windows 2000 and above. It has absoluely NOTHING to do with Linux.

"Also i see that the games/programs with it are all open source so i take it that win32 apps wont work on React OS."

Wow, I didn't know that Unreal Tournament is Open Source. As already said, it will be fully compatible to Windows. Drivers, Apps, EVERYTHING. Look a bit more closely and you will see a Wiki Page full of screenshots.

"Will it get fragged thus needing a defragger, and will it work on a 64 bit system?"

It will fragmaent as every OS does. Right now ROS uses FAT32 and thus will fragment very nicely. Yes it will run on 64 Bit Systems, right now only in 32 Bit mode, but in the future in 64 bit too.

And a samll sidenote. If you would have tried to use the Search button or look into the Wiki, you would already know answers to all of these questions! Please do so the next time, ok?

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Post by To-mos » Mon May 14, 2007 7:12 pm

Wow, I didn't know that Unreal Tournament is Open Source. As already said, it will be fully compatible to Windows. Drivers, Apps, EVERYTHING. Look a bit more closely and you will see a Wiki Page full of screenshots.

And a samll sidenote. If you would have tried to use the Search button or look into the Wiki, you would already know answers to all of these questions! Please do so the next time, ok?[/quote]

Sorry about that... also I dont know if UT is open source or not...I was basing my facts that quake is now an open source game, along with the others.[/quote]

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Post by EmuandCo » Mon May 14, 2007 7:24 pm

This was ironic :wink:

To-mos
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Post by To-mos » Mon May 14, 2007 9:40 pm

Quick Info not all OS fragment linux doesn't ever heres why...

Linux Fragmentation

Defragmenting

Short answer? You don't, you can't, you don't have to, stop reading.

Longish answer:

The extfs (extension 2 file system) that Linux OS operates under is resistant to fragmented files. Fragmenting happens when a file (of any size) will not 'fit' in a single space on the hard drive. A single space means a continguous linear range of sectors. Instead, the file is broken up to fit in a number of spaces on the hard drive. These 'spaces', and their size, occur randomly on a Windows file system as files are deleted. The reason why fragmentation is a bad thing (tm), is that reading linear sectors is AT LEAST 1000 x faster than seeking over an entire disk surface.

To put it very simply, while not entirely accurate, Linux will NOT split a file over a disk surface, instead, it finds the most appropriate space.

The More You Know :wink:

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Post by EmuandCo » Mon May 14, 2007 9:48 pm

EXT2 will come for ReactOS in the near Future

To-mos
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indexing function

Post by To-mos » Mon May 14, 2007 9:48 pm

Are you planning to put an indexing service into the built-in search function, so it would find stuff faster?

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Post by hto » Mon May 14, 2007 10:33 pm

EmuandCo wrote: The Kernel was written from scratch [...] It has absoluely NOTHING to do with Linux.
Well, look at the sources, you will see the name of Linus Torvalds in them. :)

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Post by To-mos » Mon May 14, 2007 10:42 pm

EmuandCo wrote:"Is the React OS run on it's own core or is it taken/inspired from linux."
ReactOS uses its own Kernel which is based on the NT Architecture like Windows NT/200/XP/Vista. The Kernel was written from scratch and it aims to be fully compatible to Windows 2000 and above. It has absoluely NOTHING to do with Linux.
Shure it was not taken from linux EmuandCo. :P

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Post by Z98 » Tue May 15, 2007 1:14 am

The "Linux does not fragment" idea is a myth. While the ext family is better protected against fragmentation of individual files, it has major problems when it comes to fragmentation of related files. This can result in far worse performance issues if the harddrive has to spin multiple times in order to find the files it needs to run one app. This also drains power.

Yes, they've been working on fixing this issue, but the basically denial attitude that many Linux supporters presented has slowed down attempts to fix it. And even ext will fragment eventually. No filesystem is so perfect that it will not fragment.

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Post by oiaohm » Tue May 15, 2007 12:44 pm

Z98 that is a myth. Fragmentation of related files is not as large issue. Scary bit is putting related files near on the harddrive can cause more spins depending on when the files are needed..

Linux uses copy on write in memory and heavy amounts of caching. That has a bigger effects on reduction of reading from the drive.

Fragmentation resistance and with better memory management. Puts power usage on linux ahead in most cases.

Working out how to handle related files is really complex. Should you put the close or should you spreed them and kinda interleave them. Both are dependent on how the application accesses its files.

Ext2 does fragment eventually. Its the eventually bit normally years unless you get the drive over 90 percent full. Please note there is even protection to prevent that. Only root can use the last 10 percent on a drive. Any user can use http://vleu.net/shake/ under linux without security risks. Direct filesystem access is not required to defrag individual files. Please note shake works on any fragmentation resistant file system under Linux.

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Post by Z98 » Tue May 15, 2007 2:47 pm

If that's a myth then it must be bad luck that every Linux install I have I'm dealing with very loud HDs? When Windows never had this issue?

The primary annoyance for me is the attitude in the Linux community that they don't need defragmentation, and thus don't devote much energy on working or keeping it up to date, even though such utilities would be useful. People that continue to perpetuate this attitude will more likely than not draw my scorn. It unfortunately seems to be a common attitude within the free software community, to bury their heads in the sand and avoid topics that make sense but are difficult to work with.

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Post by mf » Tue May 15, 2007 3:01 pm

Z98 wrote:The "Linux does not fragment" idea is a myth.
Nobody ever says "Linux does not fragment". The answer is usually "ext2 hardly fragments", or "well, you could defragment ext2, but it would probably be a waste of time". You see, fragmenting of single files is a MUCH bigger issue than fragmenting of related files. And usually, fragmenting of single files goes hand-in-hand with fragmenting of related files. I really don't see your point. Do you think that because FAT for instance fragments single files, it will not fragment related files? My experience is quite the opposite. It will merrily do both and scatter EVERYTHING across your entire hard drive. The same appears to go for NTFS, though since switching to NTFS I haven't had much fragmenting myself because I often transfer files between hard drives, which incidentally happens to be the best method of defragmentation; when copying all files to an empty drive, they get written alphabetically, in order of hierarchy, and contiguously. If you're really worried about fragmentation though, the best solution is to get a sizeable RAID-0 or RAID-5 array in XFS or JFS; seek times will be so fast that fragmentation goes from being a non-issue to NO issue. I've recently done so and I can recommend it; I got an eightfold increase in read speed :).

Edit: Oh, and RAID arrays are more silent too, I've had the disks that are now in the array as regular disks and they were very loud, but now I simply don't hear them anymore.
It compiles, let's ship it!

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Post by Z98 » Tue May 15, 2007 3:30 pm

No, that never was my point. My point basically revolved around the reasoning by some people that just because it "rarely" happens it means you never have to deal with it. My Windows machines "rarely" crash but I still have to know how to deal with it. For that matter, the last crash was hardware induced, not software. And if you can point out the flaws with this comparison, you can obviously pick out the sarcasm and what the comparison is trying to illustrate.

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