Misleading word usage in Chinese translation of home page

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fyn
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Misleading word usage in Chinese translation of home page

Post by fyn »

http://www.reactos.org/zh/index.html

At the very beginning, it says ReactOS aims to provide a *free of charge* operating system. I don't think that is what ReactOS really means and thus misleading. I strongly suggest it be corrected.

Besides, punctuation is using different codings. Some commas and periods are using some western language coding while others using a Chinese coding (commas are thicker, and periods are circles). That makes the page looks not so good. Either one is OK, but not both.

Maybe the maintainer of Chinese translation could do some work to change those ? Thanks.

Haos
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Post by Haos »

You are welcome to make contributions to webpage and ROS translations. From my personal experience i can say that it is better to do it yourself than just to point it out, at least it`s a lot faster:)

Hope to see you around,

Regards

hto
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Post by hto »

I also ask somebody to check Chinese translation of the very OS. There are no people to verify its quality.

billyswong
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Post by billyswong »

I would like to participate in that. Translation of technical terms may not be my strength, but at least I have confidence in my common English & Chinese language understanding.

- From a guy who is born and live in Hong Kong

lililjlj
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Post by lililjlj »

As my attemption to modify the terms with insufficient privilege, could anybody explain it? I am also Chinese- but from mainland.

The "Free Software" are translated as "free with no charge"

billyswong
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Post by billyswong »

Should the above be counted as spam and/or advertisement?


BTW, some update of the situation of Chinese translation: I am now the maintainer of webpage Chinese translation, and is trying to push the Chinese version of the site back up to date.

For the translation of the very OS as asked by hto, this is a more difficult problem. Those who aren't Chinese may think one can just follow how Microsoft do the translation. But in reality, how technical terms were translated and the use of language are very different in zh-tw(traditional Chinese, most used in Taiwan & Hong Kong) and zh-cn(simplified Chinese, invented by the communist government in China). And I haven't started discussing the problem of many-to-one relationship between trad. and simp. Chinese yet. (Simply put, there are several different origins for some simplified Chinese character, which make auto simp.-to-trad. translation almost always filled with mistakes.)

Therefore, there needs some group discussion and huge decisions made before we can "verify" those translation of ROS. The bottom line: I have never owned nor used a simplified Chinese Windows machine for any significant time. So, I cannot do any authoritative verification for those translation done in simplified Chinese.

Haos
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Post by Haos »

I would say yes, especially as he links to his site. Also the signature shouldn`t contain commercial ads.

I suppose he`ll get busted very soon.

Z98
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Post by Z98 »

I suppose the point would be, how difficult is it for someone who knows Traditional Chinese to work with Simplified? Cause I'd prefer Simplified if only because it's for official documents in the mainland.

billyswong
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Post by billyswong »

I can check grammatic correctness but not the "correctness" of individual terms as long as I haven't got a copy of simplified Chinese Windows.

Take an example, (from my memory) "File" & "Help" on the menu bar are translated 文件 & 帮助 in simp. Chinese Windows, while they are translated as 檔案 & 說明 in trad. Chinese Windows, pretty different phrases. Which ones "better" are usually more or less a matter of taste and convention. I am sure there are lots more cases like that.

Clarification: Personally I strongly disagree in saving documents' original in simplified Chinese writing. It is simple to translate the writing of trad. Chinese to those simplified correctly but not vice versa. Not long ago, I found my name 黃郁善 (郁=fragrant, luxuriant) got mistakenly printed as 黃鬱善 (鬱=gloomy, depressing) somewhere because of those erroneous trad./simp. auto translator. It is not a good feeling when your name got written wrong because of stupid technical issue...

Z98
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Post by Z98 »

I spoke to my parents (born and raised in China so they have a much better grasp of Chinese than myself) about the issue. I'm curious, but does Microsoft localize differently for Hong Kong and Taiwan differently than it does for the mainland? Cause otherwise, I would still prefer simplified simply because it's a hell of a lot easier to learn to write and read (again, this is simply opinion, I can't really stop you from translating into traditional).

billyswong
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Post by billyswong »

Yes, they localize technical terms in different wordings. For another example, "default" was translated as 預設(preset) in Taiwan (and HK follow suit); however, it was translated as 默认(acquiesce) in mainland. Two groups of people and two sets of culture.

And no, "simplified Chinese" aren't much easier to learn to write and read. Just like you won't find English much easier by ruling that every words shall be written in its abbreviated form ("No! you shd wrt 'abbr form' from now on!") plus some special rules such as "hour" shall be written as "our" just because they pronounce the same... And worse, those simplification of Chinese don't even help you type faster into the computer, which is what matters today.

Z98
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Post by Z98 »

That's debatable. Most of the simplified characters are that, simplified with less strokes, but it's a matter of personal opinion and what you grew up with. Anyways, if things are translated differently, we might want to look into following suit. I'll speak with Fireball and frik85.

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