Which your favorite programming language??

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ko rikisulda
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by ko rikisulda » Sun Feb 06, 2011 5:12 pm

I started off with Visual basic 6, went on to VB .net and now I also know (a very small bit of) java, C++, C and a bit more of ASM

greenie
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by greenie » Mon Feb 07, 2011 3:14 am

My path of languages I've learnt since i was a child QBasic->vb->java->php->javascript->c++->c->assembly(mips only at the moment)

I really don't have a favorite language. I feel all come up a bit short in some way. Though the most interesting languages are assembly and c. As you can try relate how other languages work. Though you will pull your hair out sometimes :p.

patternjake
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by patternjake » Mon Feb 07, 2011 6:32 pm

Since I haven't posted in a long time, I would say C#, since it's my forte'.

Second best would be Java for it's portability. Runs on nearly every OS out there. If I spent more time with it, it would probably replace C#.

bntser
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by bntser » Fri Mar 25, 2011 1:41 am

My favorite language is Java, and since C# is so similar I like it too. The one language I hate is Visual Basic :(

ywq111
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by ywq111 » Fri Mar 25, 2011 4:02 am

autoit and dotnet

nfries88
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by nfries88 » Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:31 pm

Generally I prefer C or C++, because I like to manage my own memory.

I will stay away from all things BASIC.

For web development, can't beat PHP.

luluthefirst
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by luluthefirst » Wed Apr 06, 2011 12:05 pm

C, PHP, HTML, VB6

Saibamen
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by Saibamen » Wed Apr 06, 2011 7:14 pm

PHP
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PurpleGurl
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by PurpleGurl » Thu May 12, 2011 4:54 pm

Aeneas wrote:BASIC. Such as in QBASIC.

Yeah, you can dissent if you like. But for the purpose of its existence, I find it brilliant, namely to quickly create or understand rather small programs. I'm not saying you can make Office in it. But I am saying that most people do not want to make Office anyway. I once made e.g. a little tank game in it, where you say angle and velocity for the grenade... or a un-html or un-unicode application, as I had to read some such texts for university, but my computer was too primitive...

Let's see how Freebasic will will develop.
I used Quick Basic (the commercial version of QBasic which let you compile into .EXEs). Then I bought an alternative linking library so I could reduce the .EXE size. The library was expensive, but you got full source with it, and I used the source and a copy of Borland's Turbo Assembler to learn some assembly. Then I started writing small .COM files and portions of my QB programs in TASM. That gave me freedom and speed while still having the advantage of using QB.

In a few applications, I found QB actually did too much for me and slowed things down. I mean when you use a bulky command which does more than you need and requires more bulky commands to undo much of what was done. So in a case like that, you can use assembly and not do everything that was done, thus saving lots of code and machine cycles. I remember a situation where I was using the PDQ library for QB and needed to do some parsing. The PDQ implementation of giant array matrices was not as robust as using the default QB library, so I needed to use a simpler array and then parse out what I needed on the fly, emulating the Input (from a file) command. PDQ provided PDQParse which read between delimiters, but didn't account for secondary delimiters and delimiter exceptions - like if both commas and quotes were used and there were commas inside of quotes that didn't count. I first used QB commands to make the PDQParse behavior act more like QBs. But later, I either created a wrapper for PDQParse in assembly, or I rewrote a version of PDQParse which did things that way. That was much faster and smaller.

I remember how complicated the interrupt handling was in QB. You had to create a huge struct for all the registers and then call the Interrupt or InterruptX command. And even worse, QB only works with signed integers, and it could cause some strange bugs if you tried to used interrupt calls which required unsigned integers. So you'd have to check your parameters and convert to negative numbers, work with long integers, etc. Once learning TASM, I could write my own assembly modules using the processor's own INT function, directly manipulate the registers, and use unsigned integers freely. So that simplified interrupt calls, avoided QB's bulky Interrupt command, and was more efficient. It also gave compatibility between the default linking library and the PDQ library. See, they used 2 different Interrupt command structures, so you couldn't share portions of interrupt code between the default linker library and the PDQ library. There were some things you couldn't do with the PDQ library, so you would have to write in QB without it for certain types of programs. So, if I wrote a mouse module in TASM, for instance, I could then use it when linking with either library, since the assembly module did its own interrupt handling. There was no need to call an Interrupt handling module when you could natively call the interrupt from the processor. Just load the CPU registers and call it, not prepare some software call to call a bulky hand-holding module to call the interrupt for you. The QB Interrupt command was just to protect newbies from crashing things.
Last edited by PurpleGurl on Mon Aug 22, 2011 4:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

Jg99
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by Jg99 » Mon Jun 06, 2011 2:04 am

mines VB.Net

shevegen
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by shevegen » Sun Aug 21, 2011 4:54 pm

Mine is Ruby by far.

Python is ok as well.

The other languages are too cumbersome to write portable and reliable code in IMHO. Or just not as elegant as Ruby and Python.

(Perl is a pile of mess and PHP is not a "real" language from my point of view.)

SomeGuy
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by SomeGuy » Sun Aug 21, 2011 7:11 pm

An old topic, but it has my attention now and I feel like a bit of ranting today :D

I have worked with a number of programming languages over the years and I still have yet to find the Perfect general purpose language + development environment that is well supported and fairly open.

Probably my "favorite" is Oracle Forms and Reports. The awesome thing about it is that data entry/UI forms, reports for printing, and the database itself all use the same PL/SQL language, only differing by certain environment specific "built in" commands. And no need to branch off to a separate SQL library to get your data in to a form - just put the SQL directly in the code because it is basically the same thing! And the Forms/Reports developer are nice Win32 drag-and-drop IDEs sort of like VB. The language itself is sort of based on ADA integrated with SQL. The code gives you everything you need for data entry and data manipulation without mucking around with low-level stuff letting you focus on business needs. Relatively speaking, code written in PL/SQL is quite readable and understandable.

Of course the problem is this is from Oracle. :roll: It really isn't used outside of large companies or government agencies with big Oracle databases and expensive contracts. And we know how well Oracle markets and maintains their technology. (if you don't, ignorance is bliss). Even with their "Statements of Direction" you live every day wondering if they are going to "Desupport" at least some functionality you are using if not the entire thing.

For example Forms/Reports used to have a very nice native Win32 runtime client (prior to that it also had clients for classic MacOS, Unix, and some mainframe OSes). But then one day they "Desupported" that in favor of a (initially clunky) Java applet that HAD to be served up by their over complicated, middleware Oracle Application server and displayed inside a WEB BROWSER! :cry: Everybody just loves their web browsers but when it comes to massive data entry it is simply the most wrong tool for the job.

Now, for simple desktop databases nothing ever beat Microsoft Access. The underlying DB and VBA leave truckloads to be desired, but even in Win 3.x Access 1.0 just a few clicks of a wizard, a little bit of drag and drop, and *poof* instant custom desktop database application. :shock:

Of course, there will never be a "perfect" language. Most languages exist for specific reasons:
Assembler: A necessary minimal generalized set of instructions the CPU has to speak above the implementation specific microcode.
C - Originally designed as a "portable assembler".
Basic - Originally a rudimentary interpreted language with the intent of being somewhat cross platform across small custom microcomputers.
Pascal - Designed as an educational language.
Fortran - Designed for mathematics and engineering.
Cobol - Implement business needs for business people by business people.
Java - Designed as a cross platform language that was supposed to be independent of specific implementations or system specific libraries.
C#/.NET - Designed because Sun wouldn't permit Microsoft to create a bastardized, system specific, version of Java, and because at the time there was a fear legacy x86 support might disappear.
Perl/PHP/countless others - various scripting languages to replace the need for custom binaries run through web CGI.
SQL - a vaguely common database language/structure for database queries.
HTML - this is not a not a language, and the fact that anyone other than CMS coders have to "code" this indicates that the computing community has done something horribly wrong.
BrainF*ck - self explanatory. :P

Anyway, at the end of the day it all about using the right tool for the job, there is no "one perfect" language, and there are plenty of them out there.

tomleem
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by tomleem » Thu Sep 01, 2011 3:09 am

I like REXX. http://www.rexxla.org I have so much to learn but I like the name. :)
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DarkSnake-Kobra
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by DarkSnake-Kobra » Sat Oct 15, 2011 9:07 am

Personally I like C++ and Python. Probably like Python the most as it's just a fun language. :) Started out using VB.NET, but ended up hating the whole .net framework deal and the buggy Visual Studio. Nothing, but problems in my experience. Absolute garbage.
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BrentNewland
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Re: Which your favorite programming language??

Post by BrentNewland » Sun Oct 16, 2011 5:04 am

PHP. Useful for both compiled executables and html interfaces.

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